Soft Technology worklab collaboration at KHiB

KHiB staff and master students have collaborated on a lab workshop concerning advanced textiles and "muscle wire" fibers. Results from the experimental class will be part of a course for KHiB students in the spring semester.

KHiB staff and master students have collaborated on a lab-workshop concerning advanced textiles and "muscle wire" fibers. Results from the experimental class will be part of a course for KHiB students in the spring semester. The workshop will be a part of Hilde Hauan's ongoing research project "Future Textiles".

The project "Soft Technology" is initiated by former KHiB-student Hillevi Munthe and is a collaboration between Atelier Nord and Professor Hilde Hauan's ”Future Textiles” project at Bergen National Academy of the Arts. Hilde Hauan is Professor at Subject Area Textiles and Associate professor Amanda Stegell of Dept of Fine Art.

Participants also include former KHiB-student Øyvind Mellbye along with artist Nick Stevens from London. Two Master students also attended the workshop.

Experiments with form and movement in textiles
Nitinol, also dubbed "Muscle wire", is a thread of a metallic mixture of nickel and titanium that can "remember" a shape it has been given. Metal wire alternates between relaxed and straight form and the form it has been given through heating to a certain temperature. Heat can be achieved by a hair dryer, warm water, body heat and even electricity.

Amanda Steggell is making a origami-shaped cloth. It requires a lot of wire and knowledge of electrical current. If the wrong amount of current is applied, the wire may loose it's properties or even meltdown.

Quality check: Øyvind Mellby helps debugging the software used for controling time and amount of current applied to the threads.

- We test how different types of wire give different results when woven into textiles, explains Hilde Hauan. We have to experiment with material strength and handling properties and see how we can use textile material to conduct electricity and to isolate energized components. We will also use the Arduino microcontroller / lilypad to program threads.

Hilde Hauan and former KHiB-student Hillevi Munthe testing a muscle thread woven into light textiles that could function as a curtian. When the current is apllied to the thread, it contracts, thus changing the shape of the cloth. Photo: Peter Klasson

The project is funded by The Arts Council of Norway, Nordic Culture Fund and Norwegian Association for Arts and Crafts.

Amanda Stegell has documented the process at her blog "Testing Testing"

Blog: Testing Testing

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Publisert: 19.11.2010 av admin Oppdatert: 19.03.2015 av admin